Yau Tong’s dissenting owners

Yau Tong’s dissenting owners
The owner of Wing Shan Industrial Building has been  proving difficult to convince for the Henderson-led joint venture that  is hoping to redevelop Yau Tong shipyards into a residential and  tourist spot.

The owner of Wing Shan Industrial Building is proving difficult to convince for the Henderson-led joint venture that is hoping to redevelop Yau Tong shipyards into a residential and tourist spot.

Yau Tong dissenting owners

There are four remaining owners who are still not playing ball with the developer in the Yau Tong shipyard redevelopment project.
The owner of Wing Shan Industrial Building has been a thorn on the side of developer since 2002 when the Environmental Impact Assessment report noted the presence of objecting owners.
Under the master plan, Wing Shan will be replaced by T15 tower which is a 21 storey hotel.
Despite the clear intentions of the developer, the owner applied and got planning permission in 2005 to convert his industrial building into retail and restaurant use.
This was followed in 2010 by another planning approval for hotel use to be added.
Perhaps what reinforced the resolve of the owner was the fact that it had paid a premium of HK$86.47 million for change of use after getting planning approval in 2005.
The owner said inclusion of his lot in the master plan would deprive him of legitimate rights due to him from the approved planning permissions.
Another complaint was what he thought was an unfair allocation of gross floor area for each lot included in the master plan.
A solicitor’s letter from the owner to the Town Planning Board in 2011 warned that his client would seek “immediate legal redress” if the developer’s application was approved.
The HK Ice and Cold Store, near to the Wing Shan building, is the next hold out.
Under the master plan, this property would be redeveloped into a 16 storey hotel, tower T17.
The owner objected to the unfair distribution of GFA by the developer and wanted a more building height and GFA.
The owner of the existing sand depot on the opposite end of Yau Tong bay, which is to be replaced by T1 residential tower at 19 storeys in height, wanted his lot to be developed in phase 1 instead of “other phases”.
He wanted more building height and also demanded that the proposed government facilities block adjacent to his lot moved elsewhere.
The fourth objector, the owner of the existing depot with barging point nearest to Yau Tong MTR station, wanted more building height for the proposed T8 residential tower which is 18 storeys high.
He said block T8 was unfairly lowered in height when compared to the adjacent towers T7 and T9.

Danny Chung

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