When the boat comes in: Kai Tak Cruise Terminal

When the boat comes in: Kai Tak Cruise Terminal

Danny Chung

A new chapter in Hong Kong’s tourism industry begins on 12 June 2013 with the opening of the long awaited Kai Tak Cruise Terminal. Construction Post took a look at the terminal in the final run-up to opening.

Kai Tak Cruise Terminal is located on the southern end of the runway of the former Kai Tak Airport. Penta-Ocean Construction was awarded a contract worth HK$1.34 billion in November 2009 for the site formation for the Kai Tak Cruise Terminal. Works included building an 850 metre long by 35 metre wide apron area and dredging 86 hectares of adjoining seabed to allow cruise vessels to manoeuvre and berth. Photo date: 20 May 2013  (Danny Chung)

Kai Tak Cruise Terminal is located on the southern end of the runway of the former Kai Tak Airport. Penta-Ocean Construction was awarded a contract worth HK$1.34 billion in November 2009 for the site formation for the Kai Tak Cruise Terminal. Works included building an 850 metre long by 35 metre wide apron area and dredging 86 hectares of adjoining seabed to allow cruise vessels to manoeuvre and berth. Photo date: 20 May 2013 (Danny Chung)

 

French contractor Dragages Hong Kong was awarded a design and build contract in May 2010 worth HK$4.9 billion for the construction of the cruise terminal building by the Architectural Services Department. The first berth will start operations in June 2013 with the second berth following in 2014. Photo date: 20 May 2013 (Danny Chung)

French contractor Dragages Hong Kong was awarded a design and build contract in May 2010 worth HK$4.9 billion for the construction of the cruise terminal building by the Architectural Services Department. The first berth will start operations in June 2013 with the second berth following in 2014. Photo date: 20 May 2013 (Danny Chung)

 

The view from Quarry Bay. According to a paper submitted to Public Works Subcommittee of the Legislative Council’s Finance Committee, the construction floor area (excluding the apron area) is 143,600 square metres (1.55 million square feet). With the cruise terminal contract sum at HK$4.9 billion, that works out to about HK$34,115 per square metre of construction floor area. Photo date: 13 May 2013  (Danny Chung)

The view from Quarry Bay. According to a paper submitted to Public Works Subcommittee of the Legislative Council’s Finance Committee, the construction floor area (excluding the apron area) is 143,600 square metres (1.55 million square feet). With the cruise terminal contract sum at HK$4.9 billion, that works out to about HK$34,115 per square metre of construction floor area. Photo date: 13 May 2013 (Danny Chung)

 

Renowned British architect firm Foster + Partners, which previously designed the iconic HSCBC headquarters building and the Hong Kong International Airport terminal building at Chek Lap Kok, helped design the cruise terminal building.  Photo date: 10 June 2013  (Danny Chung)

Renowned British architect firm Foster + Partners, which previously designed the iconic HSBC headquarters building and the Hong Kong International Airport terminal building at Chek Lap Kok, helped design the cruise terminal building. As the terminal is a government project, it is exempt from the application of the Buildings Ordinance including procedures related to the occupation permit. Photo date: 10 June 2013 (Danny Chung)

 

In March 2012, Worldwide Cruise Terminals, a consortium of Worldwide Flight Services, a subsidiary of locally listed Shun Tak Holdings and Royal Caribbean Cruises, won the tender to operate and manage the cruise terminal for 10 years at a fixed rent of about HK$13 million, according to the government press release.  The consortium will also have to pay variable rent based on a percentage of the gross receipts. Photo date: 10 Jun 2013  (Danny Chung)

In March 2012, Worldwide Cruise Terminals, a consortium of Worldwide Flight Services, a subsidiary of locally listed Shun Tak Holdings and Royal Caribbean Cruises, won the tender to operate and manage the cruise terminal for 10 years at a fixed rent of about HK$13 million, according to the government press release. The consortium will also have to pay variable rent based on a percentage of the gross receipts. Photo date: 10 June 2013 (Danny Chung)

 

This funny looking object on top of the cruise terminal is actually a radome that will house radar facilities of Marine Department. It will replace another, older radar on the former south apron of Kai Tak Airport. According to a paper submitted to the Public Works Subcommittee in June 2011, the estimated cost for the reprovisioning of the radar was HK$88.4 million at money-of-the-day prices. Photo date: 10 June 2013 (Danny Chung)

This funny looking object on top of the cruise terminal is actually a radome that will house radar facilities of Marine Department. It will replace another, older radar at the former south apron of Kai Tak Airport. According to a paper submitted to the Public Works Subcommittee in June 2011, the estimated cost for the reprovisioning of the radar was HK$88.4 million at money-of-the-day prices. Photo date: 10 June 2013 (Danny Chung)

 

Heavy rains on 22 May 2013 when a black rainstorm warning was issued caused water leakage at the cruise terminal, raising concerns about whether the target date for opening could be met. The government however insisted the terminal would open as planned after making good any damage caused by water leakage. There was heavy rain in the late morning when Construction Post visited the terminal on the day before scheduled opening.  Photo date: 11 June 2013  (Danny Chung)

Heavy rains on 22 May 2013 when a black rainstorm warning was issued caused water leakage at the cruise terminal, raising concerns about whether the target date for opening could be met. The government however insisted the terminal would open as planned after making good any damage caused by water leakage, the cost of which would be borne by the contractor. There was heavy rain in the late morning when Construction Post visited the terminal on the day before scheduled opening. Photo date: 11 June 2013 (Danny Chung)

 

A worker stops to admire the view from the terminal. According to government estimates, the economic benefits arising from the operation of the new terminal will range from HK$1.5 billion to HK$2.6 billion per annum under different growth scenarios. Photo date: 11 June 2013  (Danny Chung)

An ASD spokesman said the terminal was practically complete by the end of May 2013 with some outstanding works which would not affect cruise liner operation. According to government estimates, the economic benefits arising from the operation of the new terminal will range from HK$1.5 billion to HK$2.6 billion per annum under different growth scenarios. Photo date: 11 June 2013 (Danny Chung)

 

The first cruise liner to berth at the terminal will be the Mariner of the Seas, which can carry more than 3,000 passengers. According to the terminal operator’s website, it will be the only visit by cruise liner until the next one on 15 October when the Voyager of the Seas makes a call. Photo date: 11 June 2013 (Danny Chung)

The first cruise liner to berth at the terminal will be the Mariner of the Seas, which can carry more than 3,000 passengers. According to the terminal operator’s website, it will be the only visit by a cruise liner until the next one on 15 October when the Voyager of the Seas makes a call. Photo date: 11 June 2013 (Danny Chung)

 

 

 

 

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